gummy dog treat recipes and close-up image of treats

Gelatine Gummy Dog Treats Recipes

101 Ways For Healthy, Gummy Dog Treats: Try These Recipes

Gelatine gummy dog treats are fun to make. Not only that, these wibbly wobbly snacks are made from a bone broth base so they are chock full of nutritional goodness. You can add almost anything to either of these base recipes (so long as it’s dog-friendly of course!).

In this article:

Gelatine gummy dog treats are also a great option for dogs that can’t eat crunchy food like hard biscuits. You’d be surprised just how many of my pet-parent customers ask me for soft or chewy treats for their fur babies.

Gummies for raw fed dogs

They’re also a fantastic option for raw fed dogs. Using the meat/veg base recipe below, you can add solids to the recipe and make gummy treats that count as your dog’s dinner. I do lots of training with my dogs and always use treats for training. I don’t want my fur-babies to turn into fur-fatties, so I just weigh out their daily treats as part of their total intake.

Lickimat recipe book

The benefits of using bone broth as a base

I cook a lot of rabbit to make treats for my brick and mortar dog treat business, so I almost always have some rabbit meat stock or bone broth prepared. Making bone broth is super easy – get the instructions here. If you don’t have time to make bone broth, you could just use a meat stock.

Alternative liquid bases for gummies

Many gummies for dogs recipes call for stock or bouillon as the base. You can of course use store-bought stock or bouillon, but please check the ingredients first: a lot of stock and bouillon have onions in them, a big toxic no-no for our pups (you can print out a list of food that is toxic to dogs here).

There are lots of other, dog-safe liquid bases that you CAN use. Avoid anything that might be problematic for your pup, eg if she has a dairy intolerance, you wouldn’t use a kefir or milk base. Here are a few options:

  • Kefir
  • Milk
  • Watermelon / apple / pear juice
  • Coconut milk
  • Almond milk

Gelatine

Gelatine is an essential ingredient in making gummy dog treats – it’s what causes the liquid to solidify. When you buy your gelatine, try to get unflavoured and unsweetened gelatine.

Buy unsweetened gelatine
get gummy dog treats recipes - gummy dog treats in paw shape

Suitable silicone molds for gummy dog treats

There are so many fantastic silicone baking sheets and molds that can be used to make dog treats. Once you start making dog treats, your kitchen cupboards soon fill up with these colourful, cooking essentials. You can use them for gummy treats, frozen treats and baked treats. Pretty versatile huh?

I find that gummies are best made in smaller sized molds. My go-to gummy molds are paw-shaped (they make 2cm wide paws) and bone-shaped (they make 3cm long bones). I use these molds for other types of treats too, so they get used a lot! You can buy the same molds on Amazon:

Buy the same molds I use on Amazon

Basic gelatine gummy dog treats recipe

There are lots of ways you can make this your own: use whichever liquid base suits your dog best, add other ingredients etc. If you decide you’d like your treats to be a little firmer, just add increase the gelatine in this recipe . Likewise, for a more wobblier gummy treat, decrease the gelatine quantity slightly.

Here is the base recipe, and afterwards a list of ideas for things you can add to it.

Ingredients

  • 180ml stock (or other dog-friendly liquid, could be just water)
  • 12g gelatine

Instructions

  • Sprinkle the gelatine over the top of 60ml of cold stock and leave it for 5 minutes. This is called ‘blooming’ and the liquid should absorb the gelatine.
  • In the meantime, bring the rest of the stock to a boil, then leave it to sit for a minute
  • Pour the hot veggy stock into the gelatine/stock and stir, mixing everything together
  • Pour this mix into your silicone molds
  • Leave to set for 2-3 hours in the fridge
  • Pop the treats out of the mold and store (see below for storage)

Other ingredients you can add to this recipe:

Experiment with personalising the base recipe by adding other ingredients. You should be able to add up to 40gr or so of extra ingredients to the base recipe – too much and the gelatine component won’t be enough to hold the gummy together. You might need a little trial and error to get it right.

  • Chia / hemp / linseed (flaxseed) seeds (grind them or soak them in a little hot water for 30 minutes first)
  • Finely chopped (or better, pureed) herbs: basil, parsley, peppermint (great for freshening the breath)
  • Finely chopped (or better, pureed) veggies: spinach, broccoli, kale, green beans, carrots, pumpkin
  • Finely chopped (or better, pureed) fruit: apples, banana, blueberries, strawberries, raspberries
  • Powdered kelp, reishi mushroom, green lipped mussel, spirulina, carob, ginger
  • Golden paste (this is a mixture of turmeric, pepper and fat / oil)

There are a few ingredients that are often used in dog treats that I personally would not use in a gummy dog treat. These include peanut butter ( I wouldn’t use this in ANY dog treats – here’s why), and pineapple. Dogs can eat pineapple, but it contains an enzyme that breaks down gelatine, so your gummies might not set properly.

get gummy dog treats recipes - gummy dog treats in paw and bone shape

Gelatine gummy dog treats made with real food!

Meat and veggies gummy dog treats recipes

Organ meat and veggies gelatine dog treats

I made this particular batch with liver and kale, but you can substitute these with other organ meat and veg.

Ingredients

  • 180ml stock (or other dog-friendly liquid, could be just water)
  • 12g / 1.5 TBS gelatine
  • 36gr meat: I used liver for this batch, but use whichever meat you like
  • 10gr veggies: I used kale. Healthy alternatives = broccoli, green beans, spinach

Instructions

Put the liver in a food processor or blender
Put the liver in a food processor or blender
Blend the liver and stock until it is like a smoothie
Blend the liver and stock until it is like a smoothie
Sprinkle the gelatine over the stock and leave to bloom
Sprinkle the gelatine over the stock and leave to bloom
  • Blend the meat and 60ml of the stock in a food processor – I do this in a drinks blender as it makes a ‘smoothie’ type consistency
  • Sprinkle the gelatine over the top of this mixture and leave it for 5 minutes. This is called ‘blooming’ and the liquid should absorb the gelatine.
Put the veg and the stock in a blender
Put the veg and the stock in a blender
Heat the veg and stock and bring to a boil
Heat the veg and stock and bring to a boil
Pour the gelatine mix into the silicone molds
Pour the gelatine mix into the silicone molds
  • In the meantime, blend the veggies with the rest of the stock
  • Bring it to a boil, then leave it to sit for a minute
  • Pour the hot veggy stock into the meat/gelatine and stir, mixing everything together
  • Pour this mix into your silicone molds
  • Leave to set for 2-3 hours in the fridge
  • Pop the treats out of the mold and store (see below for storage)

Beef and broccoli gummy dog treats recipe

My dogs also love this beef and broccoli alternative to the liver and kale gummies. You make them in exactly the same way as the liver / kale ones above.

beef dog gummy treats
Beef dog gummy treats
Dog about to get a paw shaped gummy dog treat
Toxa about to get a paw shaped gummy dog treat

How to store your homemade gummy dog treats

After the treats have set, I remove them from the mold and lay them out on a tray or plate. You can of course leave them in the mold and just remove one each time you want to feed your dog, but I almost always want to use the mold again!

Try to avoid piling them together as they might stick to each other, especially very soon after they’ve been made.

Store them in the fridge to keep them fresh. As they don’t have any preservatives, they should keep for 5-6 days in the fridge.

They can also be frozen to use later – that way you’ll always have some yummy treats ready. If you do this, serve them frozen. If you defrost them before serving, they may turn soft and horribly sticky.

Conclusion

Making your own dog treats is economical, fun and much better for your four-legged friend! It takes very little time to whip up a batch of delightful doggy morsels for your favourite mutt!

Why not go one step further and make your fur baby a washable snuffle mat for his treats? Sniffing is so important for our dogs and the combination of a snuffle mat and Pyramid Pan treats is a canine match made in heaven! Of course, if you don’t want to make a snuffle mat, you can always just buy one.

thumb image making a snuffle mat guide
getgummy dog treats recipes - gummy dog treats in bone shape
Scroll to Top